Nokia’s QT Development Frameworks | Demoed On Symbian

In June 2008 Nokia acquired Trolltech ASA to enable the acceleration of their cross-platform software strategy for mobile devices and desktop applications, and to develop its Internet services business. On September 29, 2008 Nokia renamed Trolltech to Qt Development Frameworks. Qt is one of the fastest growing development frameworks in the world, with hundreds of thousands of developers. Check out this Qt demo on Symbian, from Qt DevDays 2009.

Nokia N900 | The Full MaemoProject Video Is Now Live

After all the clues and weeks of anticipation, Nokia has finally released the Maemo Project video, which turns out to be a cleverly marketed ad campaign for the Nokia N900. The release of the N900 sees the culmination of months of testing, tweaking and hard work, all to ensure that you get the device you have been hoping for. The project however, has only just begun. The developers, fans and consumers will now essentially dictate where this device goes from here. PUSH your N900 to its limit.

The Nokia N900 Is Now Officially Being Shipped

The shipments of the Nokia N900, Nokia’s latest mobile computer based on open source Maemo 5 software, have now started. ”The Nokia N900 has generated a lot of interest since its public launch in August, which has been reflected in the device preorders,” says José-Luis Martinez, Vice President, N-Series, Nokia. “What’s exciting is the Maemo software, which takes its cues from the desktop computer and offers a full browsing experience like no other handset. We believe the Nokia N900 will be a very compelling device for people who are passionate about technology.”

At the heart of the Nokia N900 is its powerful ARM Cortex-A8 processor and up to 1GB of total application memory. Users can browse the internet the way they would on any computer and keep dozens of application windows open simultaneously on the dashboard. The panoramic desktops in the Nokia N900 can be personalized with widgets, contacts and shortcuts. Pictures and videos taken with the 5Mpx Carl Zeiss camera automatically show where they were taken, and users can add their own description tags to make searching the photos even easier. SMS and instant messages are organized as chat flow and people can convenienty switch between the multiple conversation windows. The built-in 32 GB storage is big enough to store up to 7,000 songs or 40 hours of DVD-quality video, and it can be expanded up to 48GB with an external microSD card.

Nokia works closely with the developer community and has recently seen significant innovation happening with Maemo. As a result, people will be able to discover a wide range of games, utilities, themes, panoramic wallpapers and service plug-ins for photo-sharing and messaging for the Nokia N900 through Ovi Store and Maemo Select, starting later in the year. In October Nokia announced official Qt port to Maemo 5. This means developers can use Qt software to target the Nokia N900 and that applications can be easily ported to all Qt’s supported platforms including the next Maemo 6 release as well as Symbian.

The Nokia N900 will initially be available in Europe, Middle-East, Russia and North America. It will be available in retail stores in November with an estimated retail price of EUR 500, excluding sales taxes and subsidies. It is also possible to order the device from the Nokia Online Store at http://europe.nokia.com/buy-online

Nokia N97 mini Up For Grabs

The folks at DailyMobile.se are teaming up with Womworld to send their readers a Nokia N97 Mini to trial. The N97 mini is the new, more compact variant of the N97 and brings a much more stable OS, along with a host of improvements and a redesigned outlook. The N97 mini could be yours by simply entering the contest over in this forum thread. The contest is very simple, just write in, upload a video/photo on WHY you should get to trial the N97 mini. Different media types are welcome, so you can get as creative as you like.

Nokia Initiates Charger Exchange Program

Nokia today initiated a charger exchange program, in which consumers owning certain Nokia-branded chargers manufactured by a third-party supplier are recommended to exchange these chargers for free replacements.

During a routine quality control process, Nokia identified a potential product quality issue with certain chargers manufactured by one of its third-party suppliers. The plastic covers of the affected chargers could come loose and separate, exposing the charger’s internal components and potentially posing an electrical shock hazard if certain internal components are touched while the charger is plugged into a live socket. Nokia is not aware of any incidents or injuries related to these chargers.

Only a limited number of chargers of certain model types manufactured by a single third-party supplier during a specific time period are within the scope of the exchange program. They are the AC-3E and AC-3U models, manufactured between June 15, 2009 and August 9, 2009; and the AC-4U model, manufactured between April 13, 2009 and October 25, 2009.

For more information, including how consumers can check to see if their chargers are part of this exchange program, Nokia has established a website. Consumers are asked to visit http://chargerexchange.nokia.com or their local Nokia website.

Nokia recommends consumers with chargers within the scope of this exchange program to stop using the charger and exchange it for a free replacement.